Celebrating Magnificence: Dr. Randy Wong – Philanthropic Martial Artist

Inspired by others to inspire others.

Who knew that our friendly, and unassuming tai chi teacher, Dr. Wong, has a long history of charitable deeds that he keeps under the radar? I only know a few of them…

Dr. Wong is a medical doctor who back in the 90’s went to Vietnam with the Aloha Medical Mission to perform hand and face surgeries for people who could otherwise not afford it. He mentioned to me how satisfying it was for him to offer only 45 minutes of his time to repair a boy’s cleft lip that would drastically shift the boy’s future life experience.  Last year, Dr. Wong donated his anesthesia machine to the Aloha Hawaii Mission to Nepal and contributes monthly to The Spring at charitywater.org providing needed clean water to third world communities.

Throughout his medical career, Dr. Wong has continued to augment quality of his patient care with concepts he has learned in the martial arts. For example, while performing surgery under a microscope at medical school, Dr. Wong applied his Aikido training and focused on his “dantien,” or “one-point” center.  As a result, he was the only surgeon without magnified hand tremors. Nowadays he approaches his patients with the Taoist concept of recognizing what is out of balance, and once he helps to restore that  balance, the disease disappears on its own. He also employs his knowledge of energy fields by using both sound and light therapy on his patients to encourage synchronous resonance in their cells, enabling his patients to heal twice as quickly as previously. Such techniques so effectively help his patients, many other doctors could benefit learning them. 

Dr. Wong takes time from his full work and teaching schedule to volunteer at Men’s Shed (HawaiiMensShed.org) on Saturday mornings, doing wood crafts with retired men who talk and bond over woodcrafting projects that they do together. The Men’s Shed brings camaraderie, laughter and purpose to retired men who miss their previously busy, interactive work lives. One member of the Men’s Shed lost his ability to walk and speak in a terrible accident. His buddies brought him regularly to the program, where he found little ways to contribute until – lo and behold – in less than a year he surprised all his doctors by regaining both his ability to talk and to walk!  Dr. Wong is on the Board of Directors of the Honolulu Men’s Shed, the first such organization in the United State, started here 2 years ago, and inspired by the 20-year-old Australian Men’s Shed progam. 

Dr. Wong is currently working to restore an historic, aging boat back to a sailing vessel. He was  touched by the boat’s brave tale. Shortly after the tragic Japanese tsunami of 2011, a 75-year-old Japanese gentleman, Ikuo Tateo, came up with a plan to encourage his fellow countrymen and women to keep up their spirits in the face of the crisis. He christened an old boat with the slogan Ganbatte Nihon, meaning “Japan, do your best!”.  He then shipped the boat to California and set out across the Pacific towards Hawaii by himself… with no mast, no sail, no motor, sculling over with only a rudder, arriving in Honolulu after a 48 day trip. The elderly Tateo accomplished this seemingly impossible journey to encourage others to keep fighting the brave fight. Tateo then donated his boat to an educational non-profit for children, asking only that the boat be used for kids educational outings and that they keep his story alive. Dr.Wong, an avid waterman so inspired by the man’s story, is working to restore the boat in honor of its noble history.

We are honored to have Dr. Wong Kai Ming as part of our Still & Moving faculty.

1 Comment:


  • By Robin Fujikawa 07 Dec 2018

    Expertise development can either narrow one or break through the bottom of identity. How to break through to compassionate boundlessness is a mystery that perhaps you can help us solve.

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